May 24, 2022

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Scientists stunned by NASA-captured star exploding unreleased image

Supernova residual Cassiopeia a.  This image integrates some of the early X - ray data collected by NASA's Imaging X - Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) (EFE / EPA / NASA / CXC / SAO / IXPE).
Supernova residual Cassiopeia a. This image integrates some of the early X – ray data collected by NASA’s Imaging X – Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) (EFE / EPA / NASA / CXC / SAO / IXPE).

The NASA Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPEIts abbreviation in English) presented by them First pictures Two months after launch into space.

This is a view Cassiopeia aA popular remnant SupernovaI.e. a 17th century exploding star.

The shock waves from the explosion wipe out the surrounding gas, heating it to a high temperature, accelerating the cosmic ray particles and creating a glowing cloud with X-ray light.

Other telescopes have previously studied Cassiopeia, but IXPE will allow researchers to explore in a new wayAs stated by NASA on its website.

“The IXPE image of Cassiopeia A is fantastic, and we look forward to analyzing polar data to learn more about this supernova remnant.”Said Paulo Sofita, Italian lead researcher at IXPE at the National Institute of Astronomy (INAF) in Rome.

In the image created with data collected from January 11 to 18, The magenta color concentration is similar to the intensity of X-ray light observed by IXPE. Data from another NASA X-ray laboratory is exaggerated in this image. Called Chandra. These data show High energy X-rays And are shown in blue.

The intensity of the X-rays coming from NASA's Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer's imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer is the first target of the observatory, the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.  Colors ranging from purple and blue to red and warm white correspond to increased x-ray brightness.  Created using X-ray data collected by IXPE between January 11 and 18.  (Pot)
The intensity of the X-rays coming from NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer’s imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer is the first target of the observatory, the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. Colors ranging from purple and blue to red and warm white correspond to increased x-ray brightness. Created using X-ray data collected by IXPE between January 11 and 18. (Pot)

Chandra and IXPE, with different types of detectors, capture Different levels of angle resolution or sharpness. After Chandra’s launch in 1999, its first film was Cassiopeia A. X-ray images of Chandra, for the first time, revealed that there is a. The small object at the center of the supernova remnantit is a Black hole Or something Neutron star.

“The IXPE image of Cassiopeia A is as historically significant as the lunar image of the same supernova remnant,” said Martin C, IXPE’s chief analyst, based at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Weiscope said. “This demonstrates IXPE’s ability to retrieve new, never-before-seen information about Cassiopeia A, which is currently under analysis. “

NASA explained that this is the main measurement that scientists make through IXPE Polarization, X-ray light is a way to see how it is deflected as it travels through space. Contains the polarity of light Clues about the environment in which the light appeared. IXPE’s instruments measure the energy, arrival time, and position of X-rays in the sky from cosmic sources.

Another image of Cassiopeia A captured by another telescope (NASA / CXC / RIKEN / T. SATO ET AL.)
Another image of Cassiopeia A captured by another telescope (NASA / CXC / RIKEN / T. SATO ET AL.)

With polarized data from Cassiopeia A, IXPE will allow Scientists are, for the first time, looking at how polarization varies in supernova remnants, It is about 10 light years in diameter. Researchers are currently working to develop the data The first X-ray polarization map of the object. This will reveal new clues as to how X-rays are produced in Cassiopeia A.

“Future IXPE polarized images should reveal the mechanisms at the heart of this famous cosmic accelerator.Said Roger Romani, co-researcher at IXPE at Stanford University. “To fill in some of those details, We have developed a way to make IXPE measurements Use machine learning techniques to be more precise. We look forward to seeing what we find when we analyze all the data.

IXPE was launched on December 9, 2021 from Cape Canaveral on the Falcon 9 rocket. It orbits at a distance of 600 km above the Earth’s equator. Work is a collaborative effort Pot And this Italian Space AgencyWith partners and scientific collaborators in 12 countries.

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