Rapid Ramen Cooker (2022) – Shark Tank Success!

0

Chris Johnson, who went to UC Davis, came up with the idea for the Rapid Ramen Cooker. Chris, like a lot of college students, used to eat ramen. He wanted to find a way to cook them in the microwave so they would be easier but still taste like they were made on the stove.

Chris knew from experience that the main problem with microwaving ramen noodles was too much water, so he made a square bowl the same size as a block of dried noodles with a line for water that let the noodles cook perfectly.

With a background in business and an investment of $500, Chris was able to take his idea from a prototype to the high street by selling them at his college bookstore in UC Davis. Chris reached out to stores himself and got them to agree to carry the product.

This gave him the chance to start his own business. Chris applied to be on Shark Tank because he wanted to grow his brand. He was invited to be on for Season.

Rapid Ramen Cooker On Shark Tank

Chris went into the Tank and asked for $300,000 in exchange for 10% of his business. Chris explained that ramen noodles are a college staple, but they don’t come with instructions for the microwave. Then, he showed his solution, the Rapid Ramen Cooker, and how the bowl was exactly the same shape as ramen noodles.

Chris showed how easy it was to use the product by putting the noodles in the bowl, filling it with water up to the line, and then cooking it in the microwave. He gave the Sharks samples and let Barbara try some noodles that had been cooked in the Rapid Ramen Cooker.

Mark was the first to ask why someone wouldn’t just use a bowl in the microwave. Even though Chris said that the taste wouldn’t be the same, Mark said that college students wouldn’t care because they would be drunk. Barbara said it would make a difference, and the talk turned to the business itself.

Chris said he made more than $150,000 in less than a year, and the product was in more than 2,500 stores, which he did not know anyone. All of the Sharks, especially Mark and Lori, were impressed by this since most people who come on the show want help from the Sharks to get into retail. Chris made the cookers for less than a dollar each. They sell for $5.99.

rapid ramen cooker net worth

Rapid Ramen Cooker Before Shark Tank

Chris Johnson, who went to UC Davis, came up with the idea for the Rapid Ramen Cooker. Chris, like a lot of college students, used to eat ramen. He wanted to find a way to cook them in the microwave so they would be easier but still taste like they were made on the stove.

Chris knew from experience that the main problem with microwaving ramen noodles was too much water, so he made a square bowl the same size as a block of dried noodles with a line for water that let the noodles cook perfectly.

With a background in business and an investment of $500, Chris was able to take his idea from a prototype to the high street by selling them at his college bookstore in UC Davis.

Chris reached out to stores himself and got them to agree to carry the product. This gave him the chance to start his own business. Chris applied to be on Shark Tank because he wanted to grow his brand. He was invited to be on for Season.

Read more: Pluto Pillow Review: Is It Worth It?

 Ascension of Rapid Cookers

Chris Johnson’s sales and the market grew even more after Shark Tank brought him a lot of attention. With his newfound success, he made the “Rapid Mac Cooker” to make, you guessed it, Mac & Cheese.

Now, college students and kids alike can eat their favorite foods faster in the microwave while still getting the great taste of cooking on the stove.

Great Sales, Great Reviews

Chris Johnson sold more than 2 million Rapid Ramen Cookers in the first year. He also sold more than $1 million worth of Rapid Mac Cookers.

Both of these products have great reviews on Amazon.com. As of August 26, 2016, there are 1,422 reviews of the Rapid Ramen Cooker, with an average rating of 4.6 out of 5 stars.

Read more: Adin Ross Net Worth, Physical Appearance, and More – Latest News!

Job Creation

Chris Johnson gave licenses to both “Minute Rice” and “Top Ramen (the company that invented instant noodles)” to sell his product with their food. Because of this huge deal and the demand for his product, Chris Johnson was able to team up with a business in Rancho Cordova called Paxful.

Paxful has full print and post-press services and can ship orders to hundreds, thousands, or even hundreds of thousands of addresses. Due to the partnership with Chris Johnson’s company, Rapid Brandshttps://www.facebook.com/RapidBrands/, they are likely to hire 25 more people.

rapid ramen cooker net worth

Rapid Ramen Cooker Net Worth

It was made by a man named Chris Johnson, who is also known as a Serial Entrepreneur. How much money does he have?

Well, it looks like Chris was always going to be successful. He started making money at school dances (up to $4,000 per night) and used his modeling agency to find extras for the blockbuster movie Training Day, among other things, before he hit it big with the Rapid Ramen cooker.

In some ways, the idea of an object that makes fast food ready faster is almost silly, but since 95 billion packages of instant noodles are eaten every year, it’s easy to see how he has made over $5 million in sales.

Read more: SingTrix Karaoke Machine (2022) – Shark Tank Success!

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a Rapid Ramen Cooker?

The solution to the problem of ‘instant noodles not being so instant’ is Rapid Ramen Cooker. The cooker allows the user to cook ramen noodles in the microwave oven with less water and in half the time. The cooker is sold online and is a great way to save money and time for people who are always in a rush, especially students.

Who Founded Rapid Ramen Cooker?

Chris Johnson is the founder of Rapid Ramen Cooker. Chris Johnson is a UC Davis graduate. His invention has cut downloads of college students and budgeted Chef masters to cook their foods at half the time and with less water.

As of July 2022, the company is still in business with annual revenue of $5 million and over $55 million in lifetime sales.
Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.